Sunday, November 2, 2008

Satchel Paige: Striking Out Jim Crow

Satchel Paige: Striking Out Jim Crow by James Sturm, Rich Tommaso (Illustrator), Gerald Early (Introduction)
Satchel Paige began his baseball career in the Negro Leagues in Alabama in the 1920s. For years, Jim Crow laws, which segregated blacks and whites, kept him out of the major leagues. But they couldn't stop him from becoming a world-class athlete. This is a fictionalized account of a real-life sports hero. To find out more, go to this book's homepage.

2 comments:

Jeff Mann said...

...This book promises to be widely read and is made to order for middle school boys.

Kevin Baker/New York Times said...

...It's a haunting story in which Sturm's text poignantly conveys the quiet bitterness of his hero, and Tommaso's spare, two-tone drawings brilliantly contrast the physical beauty of the old, rural South with the savagery of its social institutions. An abiding air of menace hangs over the story like a gathering storm cloud. The authors refuse to look away from anything, not even lynching, although the material remains suitable—even vital—for most children. Paige himself is as elusive here as he was in real life, but Sturm and Tommaso, along with an excellent introduction by Gerald Early, provide a telling glimpse of this consummate showman, entrepreneur and competitor, who pitched into his mid-60s and against all odds managed to rise above both the black game and the white one.